How my stand up comedy class instructor made me a better coder

Years ago, while I was still serving as a military medic my sergeant asked me why I hadn’t signed up for a unit golf tournament.

“Well sergeant,  I don’t like to do things that I do not excel at.”

Her facial expression upon hearing this was very memorable.

As I grow older I’ve started to realize that my drive to find better ways to do things sometimes gets in my way.

 

I was working on a function to recursively parse a string with multiple delimiters into an associated array.

I had it working,  but thought that I could make it more efficient.

That worked,  but thought I could make it ever more efficient.

…you get the idea.

It was getting to the point where I was getting frustrated.  There was an issue with recursive function calls weren’t returning the proper data.

I couldn’t figure it out.

I took a break and saw an email from Jim,  the instructor of the Stand-Up Comedy class I’m taking at Second City in Toronto.

The email contained some notes on a 3-minute set I’d delivered at the last class.

Jim gently pointed out that I was striving for perfection right off the bat and that it was getting in my way.

He talked about how even seasoned comics work to avoid that trap.

He was right.  I had practiced bits of the set for hours working on every nuance of delivery and wording.

I turned back to my code a few minutes later and realized that seasoned programmers and seasoned comics have some things in common.

73 lines of code became 127 lines, and done!